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8 ways to cook your thanksgiving turkey

8 ways to cook your thanksgiving turkey

Posted on Nov 4, 2020, 6:30:00 AM GMT

Turkey. It's what's for Thanksgiving in 82% of American homes according to the fivethirtyeight website. We love this tasty bird and we have 8 tasty ways to cook one, paired with some of our favorite recipes from around the web. Check them out!

Roast turkey

When you want to cook your turkey the classic way, follow the advice of an American icon: Betty Crocker! Roasting a turkey is easy as pie. Make sure your bird is thoroughly thawed and follow Betty's timetable for roasting poultry. Cook Mr. Tom until his skin is golden brown and your thermometer reads 165 degrees. See Betty's advice on roasting turkeys.

Brined turkey

Brining your turkey is a simple way to help make your bird more juicy, tender, and flavorful. Brining gives your turkey a good cold saltwater bath before you cook it to help to retain moisture. There are many recipes for a brined turkey, including this one from Martha Stewart, which is easy to follow. Just make sure you leave the recommended 24-hour time for the brine part.

Smoked turkey

We like roast turkey. But we love smoked turkey. Get out your wood chips, get out your grill, and get out of the kitchen to put a twist on the traditional Thanksgiving bird. Josh Vogel's smoked turkey recipe courtesy of Food & Wine has a step-by-step video to help you perfect the process. Smoking can be time consuming, but it's worth the wait. You can also make your smoked turkey barbeque style, Cajun style, Tex-Mex style, and more by swapping out the seasonings to suit your taste.

Beer-can turkey

Smoking isn't the only way to grill a turkey. Beer-can turkey involves placing your bird upright on the grill with an open can of beer in the cavity to keep the meat tender and juicy. However, Emeril has a different spin on the traditional beer can recipe that you cook in a vertical roaster on a BBQ pit. Instead of using the can, pour the beer in the inner well of the roaster and put the turkey on top where it can continue to moisten while cooking.

Deep-fried turkey

Deep frying your bird can make the skin super-crispy and the meat super-juicy. This method of turkey cooking is not for the faint of heart however. Set up your fryer outside, away from houses and cars. Keep children and pets away from the deep fryer. Follow all the instructions on your fryer and don't leave your set-up unattended. And , of course, make sure your bird is thoroughly thawed.

Spatchcocked turkey

When you spatchcock (also known as butterflying) a turkey, you cut out the backbone and lay the bird out flat on a baking tray. (You can get your butcher to do it for you too.) Spatchcocking a turkey helps it cook faster and more evenly. If you've never done this before, check out The Pioneer Woman with simple instructions for how to cut and prepare the turkey for optimal roasting flavor.

Tofurky

Not everyone eats meat. That's why there's Tofurky – the stuffed tofu roast for your veggie and Vegan friends and relatives. Healthy Slow Cooking has a slow cooker Tofurky recipe that's so simple to make even less savvy cookers can handle it. Just mix the sauce, pour over the Tofurky and cook on low. That's all it takes. Enjoy!

Turducken

When turkey is just not enough, there's the turducken! Which is a chicken stuffed inside a duck stuffed inside a turkey. All three birds are deboned so you get nothing but meaty goodness all the way through. The turducken takes work if you make it yourself or you can pre-order one from your local butcher. This is a dish that will definitely make an impression around your Thanksgiving table! Check out the delicious Food Network turducken recipe.

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